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The In-House Advisor Published by Shepard Davidson & Renee Inomata

Category Archives: Confidentiality

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Corporate Individual Creating a Privileged Communication May Not Control Waiving It

Posted in Attorney-Client Privilege, Confidentiality

While companies, like people, are entitled to protect privileged communications with their counsel, companies only can act through individuals. So what happens when the former CEO wants to disclose a privileged communication he had with his company’s corporate counsel? As SEC v. Present highlights, if the company does not want that communication disclosed, the former… Continue Reading

Whistleblower Immunity Required Under Defend Trade Secrets Act

Posted in Compliance, Policies & Notices, Confidentiality, Contracts, Noncompetition & Other Restrictive Covenants

The new Defend Trade Secrets Act (“DTSA”) allows owners of trade secrets to now bring a civil action in federal court to protect their trade secrets and confidential information. Further, under the DTSA, a trade secret owner may be awarded actual damages, injunctive relief, restitution, the extraordinary relief of ex parte seizure orders and, if there is willful or… Continue Reading

Consider Liquidated Damages to Deter Employees From Misappropriating Company Information

Posted in Confidentiality, Contracts, Hiring, Liquidated Damages

It is not unusual for employment agreements to mandate that when an employee leaves a company, whether voluntarily or by termination, he or she must return all company information. As the employer in EventMonitor v. Leness recently learned, however, relying on the courts to enforce such an obligation is risky, at best.

If You Have Confidential Information, Keep It Confidential!

Posted in Confidentiality, Noncompetition & Other Restrictive Covenants

I’ve been involved in many cases where it is alleged that someone violated his or her non-compete agreement or misappropriated the company’s confidential information or trade secrets. Often, the key issue has been not what the former employee did, but what the company did not do to protect the information it contends is proprietary. The… Continue Reading